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Common Childhood Ailments

Common Illness Handouts:

1. Common cold

2. Hand foot and mouth disease

3. Impetigo (pronounced "im-pe-TY-goh")

4. Molluscum (pronounced "mo-LUSS-kum")

5. Warts

6. Croup (pronounced "kr-OOP")

7. Ear infection

8. Tonsillitis

9. Bronchiolitis (pronounced "bron-kee-oh-LY-tis")

10. Nappy rash

11. Eczema

12. Asthma

13. Constipation

14. Allergic reaction

Can I give paracetamol (e.g. Panadol, Dymadon, etc) and ibuprofen (e.g. Nurofen, Advil, etc) to my child at the same time?

Panadol and Nurofen can be in your child's body at the same time (that is, they can be consumed simultaneously or close together). It's the interval between doses of the same medication that matters. For this reason, it's handy to keep a written record of any pain relief given (type and time). Some parents prefer to alternate between Panadol and Nurofen. Others prefer to give regular Panadol and add in a dose of Nurofen (or vice versa) if needed. Either strategy is OK. Panadol and Nurofen both work well to relieve pain and/or fever. Often a child will have a strong preference for one over the other, depending on flavours available!

Try this handy Medication Tracker!

Paracetamol

• Can be given every 4-6 hrs

• Maximum of 4 doses per 24 hrs

• Follow the box instructions for dosing according to your child's weight

Ibuprofen

• Can be given every 6-8 hrs

• Maximum of 3 doses per 24 hrs

• Follow the box instructions for dosing according to your child's weight

• Taking Nurofen with a little bit of food or milk can help reduce tummy upset

For instance, if you were to give BOTH a dose of Panadol AND Nurofen at 12 midday, you could give another dose of Panadol at 4pm, but no more Nurofen until 6pm. And so forth, as per the intervals described above.

Here is a helpful webpage by the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne on simple pain relief for children.

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